ENGLISH NEWS: A MALE BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR ALWAYS ADVISED TO ATTEND ROUTINE CHECK-UPS IN A BLOUSE AND SKIRT

ENGLISH NEWS: A MALE BREST CANCER SURVIVOR ALWAYS ADVISED TO ATTEND ROUTINE CHECK-UPS IN A BLOUSE AND SKIRT Credit: Shutterstock

A MALE breast cancers survivor says hospital staff always assume he’s a lady until they meet him in person as a result that so few males get the illness.

According to statistics male breast cancer makes up less than 1% of all cases of breast cancer.

Tony Herbert, 72, was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer in January 2011 after finding a lump in his right nipple which he had ignored for five months.

As Euro Weekly News understands, just three days after his diagnosis, Mr Herbert went under the knife for a gruelling two-hour single mastectomy of his right breast.

The pensioner stated he felt remoted being one in every of few males on the ward throughout chemotherapy and felt like he was battling the stigma of a ‘woman’s illness’.

According to the Daily Mail, Tony’s mammogram letters always advise him to wear a “blouse” and a “skirt” in order for him to get dressed “rapidly.

And hospital employees typically presume it’s his spouse, Brenda, who’s there for the appointment, Mr Herbert admits saying he has to “laugh it off”

Breast cancer symptoms

A lump, mass and change in the feel or position of the breast are among the most common symptoms of breast cancer. Other symptoms may include:

  • Skin changes, such as swelling, redness, or other visible differences in one or both breasts
  • An increase in size or change in shape of the breast(s)
  • Changes in the appearance of one or both nipples
  • Nipple discharge other than breast milk
  • General pain in/on any part of the breast
  • Lumps or nodes felt on or inside of the breast

General Information about Male Breast Cancer

Key Points: 

  • Male breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the breast.
  • A family history of breast cancer and other factors can increase a man’s risk of breast cancer.
  • Male breast cancer is sometimes caused by inherited gene mutations (changes).
  • Men with breast cancer usually have lumps that can be felt.
  • Tests that examine the breasts are used to detect (find) and diagnose breast cancer in men.
  • If cancer is found, tests are done to study the cancer cells.
  • Survival for men with breast cancer is similar to survival for women with breast cancer.
  • Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options.
  • Male breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the breast.

Breast cancer may occur in men at any age, but it usually occurs in men between 60 and 70 years of age. Male breast cancer makes up less than 1% of all cases of breast cancer.

 

Credit: Shutterstock

 

FacebookTwitterRedditWhatsAppTelegramLinkedInEmailCopy Link
Go Back
Written by

Cristina Hodgson

Share your story with us by emailing [email protected], by calling +34 951 38 61 61 or by messaging our Facebook page www.facebook.com/EuroWeeklyNews

Comments


    Leave a comment

    Your email address will not be published.