European Vs. New Zealand Gambling Regulations

Different jurisdictions have distinct rules that govern the lottery field. There are countries where gambling is illegal, and yet others have stringent laws gambling operators must adhere to.

Some states, however, have lenient and have created a favourable environment for lottery business to thrive. The gambling rules and regulations in Europe and New Zealand are distinguishable in various aspects. Keep reading to discover how the two regions differ in terms of gambling laws.

Highlights of European Gambling Laws

The countries in Europe are under European Union (EU). The union sets different rules for various sectors. However, although states are obligated to follow the laws of the block, still individual nations are free to set their own rules that govern multiple fields. In Europe, each country has its own rules that govern the gambling industry.

Gambling Bodies in Europe

Highlights of European Gambling Laws

The gambling industry in the EU is governed by the European Gaming and Betting Association (EGBA). The association was set in 2007 to execute various mandates, including the creation of a fair, regulated, and competitive environment for the lottery industry.

EGBA works closely with national bodies and other partners to ensure that the online gaming environment is well-governed and thriving.

Country-specific Laws

Different countries in Europe have distinguishable laws that govern online betting in their jurisdictions. For instance:

  • France – the country has a thriving lottery environment that’s governed by different bodies such as Pari-Mutuel Urbain and Francaise Jeux. France allows sports gaming, horse racing, and stud poker.
  • Spain – this country has amended the lottery laws several times to create a robust gambling environment. The recent amendment of Spanish gambling laws was done in 2012, which allows lottery operators to register their businesses. Many operators have been licensed to operate in Spain.
  • Italy – one of the best countries for a lottery operator to set up a business in Italy. The nation has lenient laws that allow operators to conduct both online and brick-and-mortar betting businesses. Punters in Italy have multiple choices and can open many accounts with various sites.
  • Germany – the gambling environment in Germany is harsh. The France government has amended its lottery laws several times to make the specific forms of gambling illegal. In 2008, for instance, the French government introduced legislation that effectively made virtual gaming and lottery illegal. The law, however, excludes the horse racing lottery.

Gambling In New Zealand

Gambling In New Zealand

Betting in New Zealand is prohibited unless it is approved by authorities who typically apply the Gambling Act of 2003. However, more and more new casinos appear in New Zealand, specific forms of betting that are not allowed in New Zealand include online betting, and banned prizes, marketing overseas gambling.

Although there are still some possible ways for gambling in New Zealand to evolve, some documents have organized this industry a little bit. The Lottery Act in New Zealand classifies betting into four categories; class 1 to 4. Each class has specific maximum rewards, turnover, and the kind of operator. The classes are listed and explained below:

  • Class 1 – this class doesn’t allow the gambling prize to be over $500. Winners under this class take all the amounts. Individuals are allowed to operate this kind of gambling.
  • Class 2 – the maximum prize amount under this class is $5000. Class 2 has a turnover of between $500 and$25000. Although this class doesn’t require a license, it must be operated by a society.
  • Class 3 and 4 – the prize amount under this class are over $5000. For class 4, a gaming machine must be applied. You must be licensed to conduct gambling business under category 3 and 4.

What’s better?

When you compare the betting regulatory environment between Europe and New Zealand, the former is much far better. The gambling regulations in most of the European countries are favourable to the operator. In New Zealand, an operator may be overwhelmed by the strict laws that may make them close business.

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