Working Over 55 Hours Per Week Can Cause High Risk Of Death

Working Over 55 Hours Per Week Can Cause High Risk Of Death. Image - Pixabay

ACCORDING to a study by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Labour Organisation (ILO), working over 55 hours a week can cause a high risk of death.

According to a study by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Labour Organisation (ILO), working over 55 hours a week can cause a high risk of death from heart disease and stroke.

Although the study, which is the first analysis to correlate working hours and loss of life, coincides with the health crises it is not related to it. However, many more people are now working remotely and from home, which has led to an increase in daily working hours, as reported by Malaga Hoy.

The Environment Director of WHO, María Neir said: “Working 55 hours or more a week represents a serious danger to health. It is time for all of us (governments, employers and workers) to recognize that long working hours can cause premature deaths.” The study was carried out using data from previous studies published in the Environment International Journal.

The conclusion was that working 55 hours or more per week increases the risk of a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) by 35 per cent and increases the risk of death from ischemic heart disease by 17 per cent, in comparison to those who work 35 to 40 hours per week.

“Although it is known that around a third of the total estimated morbidity in relation to work is attributed to long hours of work, the reality is that it is the first risk factor for occupational disease,” said WHO.

Out of the deaths recorded, most were in people ages 60 to 79 who worked 55 hours or more per week when aged between 45 and 74 years old.

“We have not found any difference between the sexes with regard to the effect of long working hours on the incidence of cardiovascular diseases,” WHO specialist, Frank Pega, informed a press conference.

However, morbidity is specifically higher among men, due to them representing a larger number of workers, and more serious among people residing and working in the western Pacific and Southeast Asian regions, where informal workers are forced to work longer hours, explained Pega.

Telework is a particular concern for WHO: “Telecommuting has become the norm for many activities, often blurring the boundaries between home and work. In addition, many companies have been forced to cut back or interrupt their activities to save money, and the people who keep their payroll are terminated. with longer working hours,”  WHO Director-General, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, explained.

He warned that “no job is worth the risk of stroke or heart disease. Governments, employers and workers must agree to set limits that protect workers’ health.”


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Written by

Laura Kemp

Originally from UK, Laura is based in Axarquia and is a writer for the Euro Weekly News covering news and features. Got a news story you want to share? Then get in touch at [email protected]

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