Greener, longer goods vehicles could be rolled out from next year

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps. Image: Gov.uk

Trial of the vehicles found them to be safer, more economical and better for the environment.

Greener, longer goods vehicles could become a permanent fixture on Britain’s roads as early as next year, the government has announced.

The move comes as the Department for Transport today publishes its response to its consultation on the introduction of longer-semi trailers (LSTs), for which the majority of respondents were in favour of their use.

It follows a nine-year trial of the vehicles – which can be up to 15.65 metres in length – that found them to be safer, more economical and better for the environment.

It’s estimated LSTs could remove up to 1 in 8 freight journeys by carrying the same amount of cargo in fewer lorries. This would support the government’s Transport Decarbonisation Plan by reducing mileage, congestion and carbon emissions.

Following the successful trial and consultation, the Department for Transport will now consider the use of LSTs on Britain’s roads outside trial conditions, and the environment-boosting vehicles could be rolled out sometime in 2022.

The announcement about steps to reduce the impact of the haulage sector on the environment comes as the UK prepares to host COP26 this November (2021)- the 26th UN Climate Change Conference.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said, “This government is committed to fighting climate change and decarbonising our transport network, and we are working at pace to achieve net zero by 2050.

“Today’s announcement is a vital step forwards as we work to introduce more environmentally friendly freight to our roads and build back greener.

“Some 57 per cent of those surveyed in the government consultation felt LSTs should be in general circulation and could see the positive effects the move would have on both the road haulage industry and Britain’s efforts to lead the fight against climate change,” he added on August 24.

Currently, the maximum weight of a lorry, 44 tons, makes it difficult for the vehicles to carry heavier goods to rail depots, meaning goods are dispersed between more lorries to be taken to their end destination by road. Taking more goods in heavier trucks to rail depots to be transported by train will help reduce congestion across the country and also slash emissions.

The trial would ensure these heavier lorries are only used on specific routes and would limit their use to a maximum journey length.


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Written by

Deirdre Tynan

Deirdre Tynan is an award-winning journalist who enjoys bringing the best in news reporting to Spain’s largest English-language newspaper, Euro Weekly News. She has previously worked at The Mirror, Ireland on Sunday and for news agencies, media outlets and international organisations in America, Europe and Asia. A huge fan of British politics and newspapers, Deirdre is equally fascinated by the political scene in Madrid and Sevilla. She moved to Spain in 2018 and is based in Jaen.

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