Unvaccinated people 32 times more likely to die from Covid

Unvaccinated people are 32 times more likely to die from Covid, according to a study.

A new study has discovered that unvaccinated people are 32 times more likely to die from the coronavirus than people who are fully vaccinated.

The mortality rate in England for fully vaccinated people is 26.2 per 100,000 according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Shockingly the mortality rate for unvaccinated people comes in at 849.7 per 100,000.

Over 34,000 unvaccinated people lost their lives to the virus between January 2 and September 24 this year. The number of deaths for people who were fully jabbed is significantly less. Less than 4,500 people died. Most of these fatalities occurred in August and September before the booster program began.

Data from Johns Hopkins University has revealed that more than 5 million people have died across the world from the coronavirus.

The Yale School of Public Health’s Dr Albert Ko commented on the global death toll. The infectious disease expert said: “This is a defining moment in our lifetime. What do we have to do to protect ourselves so we don’t get to another 5 million?”

The Health Secretary Sajid Javid is “leaning” towards mandatory vaccinations for NHS staff. This could be delayed until April next year.

Chief executive of NHS Providers Chris Hopson, commented: “If we lose very large numbers of unvaccinated staff over winter it’s a risk to patient safety and quality of care.”


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Alex
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Alex Glenn

Originally from the UK, Alex is based in Almeria and is a web reporter for The Euro Weekly News covering international and Spanish national news. Got a news story you want to share? Then get in touch at [email protected]

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