’60s and ’70s architects discuss the designs that made Benidorm (Alicante)

THE group of architects who helped to develop Benidorm in the 1970s met up there on October 13.

They were attending a round table discussion entitled The Architecture of the General Plan, the 1956 blueprint for the resort’s subsequent image and success.

This was one of several events during Pedro Zaragoza Orts Year, celebrating the centenary of the former mayor whose vision converted a fishing village into an international holiday destination.

Jose Antonio Nombela, Ricardo Llacer, Francisco Sanchis, Carlos Teba and Juan Jesus Pérez Zaragoza arrived in Benidorm in the late ’60s and early ’70s and their designs earned the resort its Beniyork nickname.

“A large part of what we see today in Benidorm is the fruit of the work of these architects who belong to the town’s living history,” said architect and patron of the Frax Foundation in Albir, Pere Joan Devesa who led the discussion.

One by one, the professionals praised the advantages of the 1956 General Plan, which made a huge leap forward by lifting height restrictions in 1963. This enshrined the sustainability of a municipality that 66 years later still follows a design that was revised in 1991 but maintained the original criteria.

“The greatest problem is that Benidorm, a town that looks at the sky in its architecture, is still misunderstood,” said Benidorm’s Toni Perez who was also present.

“One of its glories is that it seeks the sky and liberates the ground.”

 

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Written by

Linda Hall

Originally from the UK, Linda is based in Valenca and is a reporter for The Euro Weekly News covering local news. Got a news story you want to share? Then get in touch at [email protected]

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