ALL Drivers Need To Know About The DGT’s New Secret Weapon

DGT's New Stop Sign Cameras

Stop sign: credit: Adam63/Creative Commons Attribution-Share alike 3.0

The DGT has a new device that unwary drivers may not be aware of, a surveillance camera that is hidden from view.

Over the years, the Directorate General of Traffic (DGT) has brought in a plethora of fixed, mobile and average-speed check cameras. Now, the traffic authority headed by Pere Navarro, has launched a new hidden weapon secreted in STOP signs to punish drivers who fail to obey, writes OK Diario, Tuesday, July 25.

The DGT’s New STOP Camera

Statistics provided by the DGT indicate that 1,093 drivers involved in accidents with fatalities had failed to come to a standstill at a STOP sign. This is reportedly one of the most common offences on Spanish roads, after speeding and the use of mobile phones at the wheel.

Article 151 of the General Traffic Regulations states that ‘the stop sign is an obligation for all drivers to stop their vehicles at the next appropriate road marking, or if there isn’t one, immediately before the intersection and to give way to vehicles travelling on the road they are approaching.’

To catch any offending drivers, the DGT has introduced a two-camera system. The ‘stop cameras’ are cameras capable of checking whether a vehicle has come to a complete stop at the signal.

It should be remembered that when drivers encounter a yield sign it is not necessary for the vehicle to come to a complete stop, but of course, the driver is obliged to stop when it is not possible to continue because there is another vehicle with priority.

According to the DGT, a camera monitors the arrival of vehicles in the area of the stop sign. The camera is calibrated to check whether the vehicle comes to a complete stop. If they do not, the camera takes a series of photographs and sends the information to the Automated Complaints Processing Centre, where the penalty file is processed. The fine for running a stop sign is €200.

The agency places special emphasis on the need to know where to stop at a stop sign: ‘You must stop the vehicle immediately before the stop line; and if there is no stop line, immediately before the intersection, not before the sign. If there is insufficient visibility from this point, for whatever reason, you should move forward a little to stop again at a visible point, taking care not to endanger any other vehicle.’

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Written by

John Ensor

Originally from Doncaster, Yorkshire, John now lives in Galicia, Northern Spain with his wife Nina. He is passionate about news, music, cycling and animals.

Comments


    • Brian

      26 July 2023 • 15:24

      Perfect Idea. I see so many people not stopping. That will teach them

    • Naimah Yianni

      26 July 2023 • 16:25

      These two paragraphs completely contradict each other:

      “It should be remembered that when drivers encounter a yield sign it is not necessary for the vehicle to come to a complete stop, but of course, the driver is obliged to stop when it is not possible to continue because there is another vehicle with priority.

      According to the DGT, a camera monitors the arrival of vehicles in the area of the stop sign. The camera is calibrated to check whether the vehicle comes to a complete stop. If they do not, the camera takes a series of photographs and sends the information to the Automated Complaints Processing Centre, where the penalty file is processed. The fine for running a stop sign is €200.”

      Part of the problem is that Spanish road son´t have acceleration lanes, which mean that you have to pull out onto a fast moving road form a stop, which is more dangerous than not stopping. ……N340 access roads are an obvious example of brain-dead road design

    Comments are closed.